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graph
Income inequality and mortality in 282 metropolitan areas of the United States. Mortality is strongly associated with higher income inequality, but, within levels of income inequality, not with per capita income.

Image source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_inequality

 

GEOG 342: Geography of Inequality

 

Geography Librarian: Anne Zald
Office: Map Collection, Suzzallo Library, Basement
EMail: zald@u.washington.edu
Phone: 206-543-2725 (if you get voicemail, leave your contact information)
Courseweb: Geography 342
Page Guide:
  Reference works mentioned in course reading list
    Maps & Statistical Data - Visualize and Analyze Inequality
    Citation & Writing Help
Including tips on writing evaluative book reviews and sample book reviews
    Newspapers
    Finding Academic Analysis & Scholarly Articles

Reference works mentioned by Dr England in the reading list


Maps & Statistical Data - Visualize and Analyze Inequality

International Maps

United States & Washington State Maps

Statistical Data - United States & Washington State


Writing Assistance & Help with Citation Style

Writing Book Reviews

Citation & Writing Style

Writing Assistance


Newspapers

Newspapers in Washington State:

Newspapers Nationwide:


Finding Academic Analysis & Scholarly Articles

Academic books and journal articles will often examine an issue on a larger, theoretical level. Thus, you may not find an article talking about economic restructuring in Lynnwood, Washington; but you will find plenty of books and articles about the growth of American suburbia in the last half of the 20th century. To find articles that are applicable to the city you are studying stay away from the very concrete (Lynnwood, Washington) and focus on broader issues and themes (suburbs; post-industrialism; a particular industry).

Not finding anything useful?

If you get stuck looking for information Ask a Reference Librarian for more suggestions in person, on the phone, or using our 24/7 chat service. Librarians can help you with your search strategy, suggest additional places to look for information, and show you tricks for getting more out of the databases you search. Bring your assignment sheets and/or your textbook when you come talk to us--we might be experts in research, but we'll need input from you, too.

Page maintained by: Anne Zald zald@u.washington.edu
Last modified: Monday January 05 2009