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Praxis Lecture: ChartEx and the mining of medieval charters to understand sense of place

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The University Community is invited to attend a new series of lectures called Praxis: Doing Scholarship Digitally. Praxis conversations are designed to create opportunities for researchers from a variety of disciplines to come together to hear about and discuss how digital tools are being used to aid discovery and visualization across diverse fields and forms. The first Praxis conversation will feature Jon Crump, Research Historian for the Digging into Data funded project ChartEx. November 13, 12:30pm | Location: Research Commons, Allen Library South, Presentation Place

Event details

When

Nov 13, 2012
from 12:30 PM to 01:15 PM

Where

Research Commons Presentation Place

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The University Community is invited to attend a new series of lectures called Praxis: Doing Scholarship Digitally. Praxis conversations are designed to create opportunities for researchers from a variety of disciplines to come together to hear about and discuss how digital tools are being used to aid discovery and visualization across diverse fields and forms.

The first Praxis conversation will feature Jon Crump, Research Historian for the Digging into Data funded project ChartEx. ChartEx will develop new ways of exploring the full text content of digital historical records. Using tools from Bioinformatics [the Bioinformatics Rapid Annotation Tool], Natural Language Processing, and Data Mining heuristics developed by computer scientists at Brighton (UK), and Leiden (NL) Universities, this international team of researchers is attempting to create order out of a heterogeneous collection of medieval charters and archival descriptions. Ultimately, the new ChartEx tools will enable users to really dig into the content of these records, to recover their rich descriptions of places and people, and to go beyond current digital catalogues which restrict searches to a few key facts about each document (the 'metadata').