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Empires of Capital: Race Across the Atlantic and the Pacific

The two-day symposium seeks to theorize and historicize racial capitalism in the modern world. Free and open to the public. | May 17, 1-5pm, Petersen Room, Allen Library | May 18, am-4pm, HUB 334

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When

May 17, 2013 01:00 PM to
May 18, 2013 04:00 PM

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The two-day symposium seeks to theorize and historicize racial capitalism in the modern world. Building on Cedric Robinson’s insight that capitalist development has been pursued and organized fundamentally around race, speakers will strive to uncover the multiple layers of capitalist expansion—ideological, cultural, economic, and social—to reveal and comprehend the tensions and contradictions of racial capitalism in the past and in the present and across the Atlantic and the Pacific.

The symposium is free and open to the public.

May 17, 1:00 - 5:00pm, Allen Library, 4th Floor, Petersen Room
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Plenary Roundtable
Lisa Lowe (Tufts University), "Sugar, Tea, Opium, Coolies: The Intimacies of Four Continents"
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Jennifer Morgan (New York University), "Partus Sequitur Ventrem: Slave Law and the History of Women in Slavery"
Michael Witgen (University of Michigan), "Seeing Red: The Politics of Crime and Punishment on the Northern Borderlands of the Early American Republic"

May 18, 10:00am - 4:00pm, HUB Room 334
10:00 a.m. – noon
Shelley Streeby (University of California, San Diego), "Hubert H. Harrison's Scrapbooks, Racial Capitalism, and the Black Radical Tradition"
Manu Vimalassery (Texas Tech University), "Native and Black Visions of Self-Determination"

Noon – 1:30 p.m.   Lunch Break
If you will be joining us for a light lunch on Saturday, please RSVP to cspn@uw.edu or 206-543-8656 by Tuesday, May 14.

1:30 – 4:00 p.m.
Peter James Hudson (Vanderbilt University), "Black Sovereignty and Racial Capitalism: The National City Bank in Haiti and Liberia, 1910-1935"
Jodi Kim (University of California, Riverside), "Debt Imperialism, Settler Modernity, and the Necropolitics of the Promise"
Andrew Friedman (Haverford College), "Meridians and Parallels: Racial Formations on the Global Grid"

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest, the University of Washington Libraries, the Department of History, the Department of English, the Jackson School of International Studies, and the Simpson Center for the Humanities.

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