2004-2005

Monographic Services Division
ANNUAL REPORT
July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2005

I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Prepare a summary of no more than 200 words highlighting the most significant accomplishments, changes, or innovations which have occurred in your area of responsibility this past year.

The division continued to acquire and catalog a large number of items.  A major change was made in the supplier of domestic and UK titles to YBP.  In terms of cataloging, special efforts were made for media, especially International Studies media, and electronic resources.  The division led or contributed to a number of library-wide projects related to standards or software, as well as worked on projects in support of specific units such as Government Publications, Special Collections, the Natural Sciences Library, and Suzzallo Circulation.

II. MAJOR ACTIVITIES, ACCOMPLISHMENTS, OR SIGNIFICANT CHANGES

Enumerate major projects, accomplishments, and activities for the year.  Briefly describe significant changes in such areas as user services, facilities, technology, equipment, and infrastructure.  Include alteration, elimination, or transformation of services and procedures as well as redesign of processes.

Monographic Acquisitions led a library-wide effort to move monographic and standing orders from Blackwell’s Book Services to YBP.  Approval plans for three campuses were rewritten, liaisons were trained in the use of GOBI, automated processes were revamped, and new ordering and receipt procedures were put in place.  All of this was implemented during the peak order period of the biennium, yet the flow of orders and books was good, without large backlogs.

The media cataloging for International Studies materials completed this year doubled the amount held by the library.  Special projects and backlogs were addressed for Urdu, Arabic, Hindi, Chinese, Korean, Georgian, Persian, Indonesian, Thai, Slovenian, Latvian, Lithuanian and Estonian films, videos, DVDs and CDs.

Acquisitions brought to a close a two-year system-wide effort to improve standards for order records in Innovative.  Documentation was developed and staff on three campuses trained.

Authority processing of records in the library catalog by the MARS service was moved from OCLC to Backstage Library Works, subsequent to a purchase by the latter.

Catalogers provided leadership for the move from OCLC Passport to the Connexion Client.  Several staff participated in beta tests of versions of the Client, prepared training and documentation for OCLC users in Monographs and in other library units, and installed software.

The Database Management Section continued work on the retrospective cataloging of pre-1976 U.S. government documents, completed final work on the merger of the Forestry library into the Natural Sciences Library, and began to provide support for a reclassification project of Dewey call numbers in the Suzzallo main stacks.

Staff in Monographs made significant contributions to system-wide training for Millennium Acquisitions, including liaisons, branch staff, and staff in other acquisitions units.

A number of digital projects were completed, including the Pacific Northwest Sheet Music Collection, People’s Protest, and Alaska & Western Canada photographs.

The division contributed to implementation of the Innovative Electronic Resources Management module, in particular, with regard to policies, practices and workflows for monographs.

Acquisitions led an effort to diagnose problems with negative encumbrances in Innovative fund reports.  Procedures for a cleanup project were devised and tested, but are best carried out during a period of low order volume at the beginning of the next biennium.

Staff in Database Management worked on a project to support the conversion of accession records in Special Collections.  For each group of materials, a collection-level record was created in ERM, a brief public bibliographic record was input for the catalog (if one did not already exist), and all accessions were linked together.

A Latin American approval plan was initiated with the Latin American Bookstore.

A sample of Thai cataloging by Backstage Library Works was evaluated and an agreement was reached with them to provide original cataloging for 80 titles.

Over 100,000 new records were loaded for electronic and microform sets, including nine new sets and additions to six other sets.

III. OPPORTUNITIES, ISSUES, OR CONCERNS FOR THE COMING YEAR

Media materials, particularly video and DVD, continue to grow at a fast pace.  Overall, we need greater cataloging support in this area.  The problem is particularly acute for International Studies materials: the range of languages is extremely broad, so that no cataloger could hope to cover them.  The only feasible approach is to use student language informants, but this is slow and labor intensive.  We have been able to limp along by funding temporary help with a series of small grants and salary savings, but this is far from a fundamental or long-term solution.  We have been extremely fortunate to have a skilled and trained librarian available for part-time temporary work, but we could lose her to another institution at any time.

The student hourly budget is an ongoing concern.  Our student employees make a critical contribution to the work of Database Management, Acquisitions, and parts of the cataloging operation.  The shift of some tasks to students is permanent and we no longer have full-time staff to cover them.  There is a downward trend in student hourly appropriations not only in Seattle, but in Bothell and Tacoma as well.  Some tasks cannot be curtailed, and others, such as the retrospective cataloging of government publications, have a high value and we want very much to continue them.

Support for new collection areas in International Studies is a problem, particularly with regard to language expertise in cataloging.  Apparently, the library will begin or expand collecting in Tagalog and Greek.  We have no staff with even a rudimentary knowledge of these languages, and no vacancies to hire additional catalogers.  We may be able to hire students to do simple copy cataloging, but complex copy and original cataloging are more difficult.  Using students as language informants, alongside a cataloger, is workable only for rush titles:  this method is labor intensive and our catalogers are already fully committed to other assignments.

The number of electronic monographs continues to grow, and they raise many issues.  We anticipate spending a good deal of time sorting through the issues in the coming year.  For example, we see an increasing number of titles published in PDF format, and we are investigating ways to make them accessible to our users.  Questions about purchasing procedures and licensing abound.  We continue to develop procedures and workflows for cataloging, especially in light of the Innovative ERM module.

Metadata standards and trends need to be monitored closely.  Changes are coming both in traditional metadata formats (AACR) and in other metadata schemas.  It is still too early to predict what direction these trends will take, but we can be certain that the long-term impact on the division and on the library’s bibliographic systems will be great.

Vernacular script support in the library catalog has long been desired by International Studies, and new developments are making it more of an issue.  With the release of an upcoming version of the OCLC Connexion Client, we will be able to create records in scripts that have not been possible before on OCLC, such as Cyrillic, Greek and Hebrew.  One issue is how well Innovative supports these scripts, and whether we should purchase additional language modules from them.  A second issue is the extent to which we should implement these scripts.  It is some additional effort to add scripts to current cataloging, but perhaps this is manageable.  A much larger question is whether or how we would add scripts to existing catalog records.  In effect, we potentially face a large re-cataloging project, which will certainly require additional resources.

IV. MAJOR ACQUISITIONS, GIFTS, OR GRANTS RECEIVED

Marsha Maguire contributed significantly to Phase 1 of the Northwest Digital Archive grant, which was successfully completed on December 31, 2004.  Funding for Phase 2 has been secured from NEH.

Cathy Gerhart was awarded a Friends of the Libraries grant to hire a cataloger for maps in Special Collections and the Map Section.  She also received funding from the East Asia Library for assistance with cataloging CJK media.  Additional cataloging for media was funded by a 21st Century grant.

Marsha Maguire and Eileen Llona received a 21st Century grant to conduct a pilot project with METS (Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard).

V. PERSONNEL

Libraries Personnel will provide a list of appointments, promotions, transfers, resignations, and retirements for use in the Personnel Section.  Add additional personal information that is not provided centrally.

A. APPOINTMENTS

B. PROMOTIONS, TRANSFERS, RESIGNATIONS, AND RETIREMENTS

C. HONORS AND AWARDS

Service Awards:

May Rathbone, 15 years

Mary Mathiason, 30 years

D. APPOINTMENTS AND ELECTIONS TO LIBRARY OR UNIVERSITY RELATED OFFICES OUTSIDE OF THE UW LIBRARIES

Cathy Gerhart

Past President, Online Audiovisual Material Catalogers (OLAC)

Adam Schiff

Chair, ALCTS/LITA/RUSA MARBI Committee, July 2004-June 2005

Chair, PCC Standing Committee on Training Task Group to Update the SACO

Participants' Manual, 2005

E. PUBLICATIONS, PRESENTATIONS, PERFORMANCES, AND EXHIBITIONS

Diana Brooking

Co-author, “Exploring METS:  A Case Study Using Architectural Papers,” presentation at DLF Forum, Baltimore, October 26, 2004

Guest Lecturer, “Foreign Language Cataloging,” UW ISchool, May 17, 2005

Patricia Carey

Co-moderator, ALCTS Pre-Order Pre-Catalog Searching Discussion Group, ALA Midwinter Meeting, Boston, January 2005

Jacqueline Coats

Co-moderator, ALCTS Pre-Order Pre-Catalog Searching Discussion Group, ALA Midwinter Meeting, Boston, January 2005

Cathy Gerhart

Guest Lecturer, Advanced Cataloging class, UW ISchool, May 10, 2005

Instructor, Sound Recordings Cataloging Workshop, Oregon Library Association, Portland

Author, “Stitch and Bitch:  Neighborhood Knitting Group as an Information Ground,” Information Behavior in Everyday Contexts (IBEC) web site

Marsha Maguire

Instructor, two workshops on Oral History Cataloging, Online Audiovisual Catalogers Conference, Montreal, October 1-3, 2004

Co-author, “Exploring METS:  A Case Study Using Architectural Papers,” presentation at DLF Forum, Baltimore, October 26, 2004

Co-author, “Searching for Nirvana:  Cataloging and the Digital Collection at the Experience Music Project,” Journal of Internet Cataloging, vol. 7, no. 1 (2004)

Adam Schiff

Instructor or Co-instructor, ALCTS/PCC Cooperative Cataloging Training workshop "Basic Subject Cataloging Using LCSH":

Oct. 25-26, 2004, Los Angeles, CA, sponsor: Southern California Technical Processing Group

Nov. 4-5, 2004, Corvallis, OR, sponsor: Oregon Library Association Technical Services Roundtable

Dec. 15-16, 2004, Seattle, WA, sponsor: OCLC Western

Jan. 24-25, Los Angeles, CA, sponsor: UCLA

Jan. 26-27, Ontario, CA, sponsor: OCLC Western

Apr. 19-20, 2005, Vancouver, BC, sponsor: British Columbia Library Association

May 23-24, 26, 2005, Seattle, WA, sponsor: University of Washington Libraries

Presenter, "Descriptive Cataloging of Electronic Resources", Alaska Library Association Cataloging Roundtable, Barrow, AK, March 2005

Guest lecturer on SACO, Advanced Cataloging and Classification, UW ISchool, Apr. 25, 2005

Co-presenter/trainer, SACO Mentoring Workshop, ALA Annual Meeting, Chicago, June 24, 2005

Selected to be a trainer for the Cataloging for the 21st Century course "Rules and Tools for Cataloging Internet Resources"

F. DEGREES RECEIVED BY STAFF

G. OTHER SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Three “first-ever” script records were input in OCLC using Connexion Client, version 1.4 beta.  Cyrillic: Diana Brooking; Hebrew: Adam Schiff and Janet Heineck; Greek: Mary Kalnin

VI. MAJOR GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND ISSUES FOR 2005-2006

Tie to the Key Action Areas of the Strategic Plan if appropriate.

Continue the automation of acquisitions processes, including the download of records from Baker and Taylor School Select, online selection of titles with Casalini Libri, and the loading of approval titles from Coutts.

Evaluate Millennium Cataloging for use by catalogers and database management staff; develop and deliver a training program as dictated by the results of the evaluation.

After the installation of EDIFACT software on Innovative, reconfigure electronic transmission of orders from BISAC to EDIFACT, in support of the new ISBN 13 standard.  Begin with smaller vendors to gain experience, convert YBP, and then do the remaining smaller vendors as they are able to support EDIFACT.

Develop a policy concerning when to add non-roman script to cataloging records for languages where this is now possible through OCLC.

Implement DACS (Describing Archives: A Content Standard) in Monographic Services.

Devise a plan to further reduce a backlog of government publications in the sub-basement.

Review and make adjustments to the Seattle approval plan.

Develop cataloging policies for graphic novels and manga.

Complete a project to correct negative encumbrances in Innovative fund reports.

After a pilot project on METS and MODS is complete, decide what further steps should be taken to investigate and experiment with these standards.

Archive order records on Innovative.

Recruit for and fill two vacancies in Monographic Acquisitions.

Addendum to the Annual Report for Strategic Planning

Key issues and trends outside the Libraries that will affect and shape the ways we server our users over the next five years:

AACR.  Revision of the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR), which is called  Resource Description and Access (RDA), will affect how we record and present bibliographic data to users through the library catalog and other systems.  The incorporation of Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) should, we hope, provide for more clarity in describing the relationships between bibliographic entities.

Metadata.  The further development and implementation of metadata standards will affect digital initiatives in many ways.  Standards such as METS (Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard) and MODS (Metadata Object Description Schema) will provide the ability to encode more complex relations among materials and to share metadata more effectively with partners, consortia and confederated search engines.  Emerging standards for preservation metadata will allow for better control of materials over time.  An example of a  specific use of preservation metadata is the 583 Preservation Action field in the MARC record.

Cataloging Standards.  New cataloging standards for electronic resources, such as the Library of Congress Access-Level Record, should allow for more timely cataloging of web resources.

DACS.  Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) should improve cataloging of manuscript and archival collections.

Institutional Repositories.  The implementation of an institutional repository such as DSpace will improve the preservation and access of locally produced scholarship.

Google.  Initiatives at Google, such as Google Print and Google Scholar, will have an impact on access to and the marketing of titles.

STATISTICAL APPENDIX

Tables should include statistics for current year.  Please highlight any significant changes or trends.  UW Seattle circulation, instruction, gate count, reference sampling, and collection size statistics will be provided centrally.

2003/04 – 2004/05 Comparison

Acquisitions Activity

 

2003/04

2004/05

% Change

Electronic Order Requests

17,653

23,354

+32.3

Firm Orders

5,497

4,398

-20.0

Approval Records Loaded

8,521

7,205

-15.4

Total Records Processed

31,671

34,957

+10.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approval Receipts

8,981

7,826

-12.9

Approval Returns

360

1,384

+284.5

Approval Return Rate

4.0%

17.7%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Claims

0

0

--

Pro Form Invoices

142

256

+80.3

VISA Orders

604

752

+24.5

Media

1,346

1,807

+34.2

Rush Orders

1,512

1,440

-4.8

Rush Receipts

1,812

1,936

+6.8

Vols. Sent to Cataloging

9,410

10,293

+9.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Backlog

June 2004

June 2005

 

Order Requests

155

110

-29.0

Receipts

1,115

50

-95.5

Gifts

5,818

5,382

-7.5

Cataloging Activity

 

2003/04

2004/05

% Change

New Titles Cataloged

 

 

 

Original

7,088

5,454

-23.0

Complex Copy

20,001

21,006

+5.0

Quick Cataloging – Acquisitions

23,603

26,590

+12.7

Quick Cataloging - Cataloging

13,138

10,340

-21.3

Minimal Level

7,457

4,539

-39.1

Total

71,287

67,929

-4.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added Copies

6,742

10,700

+58.7

Added Volumes

1,321

1,745

+30.1

Rush Materials

1,266

1,304

+3.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catalog  Maintenance

 

 

 

Central withdrawals/discards

1,794

1,253

-30.2

Recataloging

202

166

-17.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NACO Headings

3,723

3,417

-8.2

SACO Headings

825

1,022

+23.9